26 July, Monday — Sheltering from the storm

Jul 26 – Sts. Joachim and Anne, parents of the Virgin Mary By tradition, Joachim and Anne are considered to be the names of the parents of Mary, the Mother of God. We have no historical evidence, however, of any elements of their lives, including their names. Any stories about Mary’s father and mother come... Continue Reading →

23 July, Friday — Seeds scattered and sown

Jul 23 – Memorial for St. Bridget of Sweden, Religious Coming from a noble yet religious background, St. Bridget (1302-1373) was friend and counsellor to many priests and theologians of her day. As chief lady-in-waiting to Queen Blanche of Namur, she counselled and guided the Queen and King Magnus II. She was harassed by others... Continue Reading →

22 July, Thursday — Remain Teachable

Jul 22 – Memorial for St. Mary Magdalene There is actually very little solid information about her, and both scholars and traditions differ on the interpretation of what we do know. She was a friend and follower of Jesus. Filled with sorrow over her sin, she anointed Christ, washed his feet with her hair. He... Continue Reading →

21 July, Wednesday — Be Rich!

Jul 21 – Memorial for St. Lawrence of Brindisi, priest, religious, doctor St. Lawrence (1559-1619) joined the Capuchin Friars in 1575. He studied theology, the Bible, French, German, Greek, Spanish, Syriac, and Hebrew. He was an effective and forceful preacher in any of his several languages, founded convents and wrote catechisms. As the chaplain of... Continue Reading →

14 July, Wednesday — Child-like curiosity

Jul 14 – Memorial for St. Camillus de Lellis, Priest St. Camillus (1550-1614) used to be a gambling addict. He lost so much he had to take a job working construction on a building belonging to the Capuchins; they converted him. Because of a persistent injury, he moved into San Giacomo Hospital for the incurable,... Continue Reading →

9 July, Friday – To Save Our Life

Jul 9 – Memorial for St. Augustine Zhao Rong, priest, & companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria in the 600s. Depending on China’s relations with the outside world, Christianity over the centuries was free to grow or was forced to operate secretly. The 120 martyrs in this group died between 1648 and... Continue Reading →

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